Maple Pumpkin Spice Quinoa Granola

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A recent NYMag.com headline stated: “America Hits the Pumpkin Spice Saturation Point”. They’ve got a point. If you’ve been to Trader Joe’s in the past two months, you’ll notice the PS (pardon the abbrev) domination in all manner of prepared foods. From beer to baking mix and frankly, All The Carbs, food marketers have jumped on the PS bandwagon and they’re not getting off.

The pumpkin squash, in itself, is not super flavorful. But when combined with cinnamon-spice and everything nice, it becomes an obsession. In an effort to stay as true to it’s roots (pumpkin pie, remember that?), this granola hits all of fall’s high points. Maple syrup, toasty oats and warming spices create a simple topper for yogurt, ice cream or simply stuffed in your face by the handful (…ahem…) I stopped buying cereal regularly a few years ago, so this tasted liked heaven to me with some almond milk and banana. I got in the habit of adding quinoa to my granola after I ran out of sesame seeds one day. Granola is really a blank canvas for anything lurking in your pantry – so add those sesame seeds, or pumpkin seeds, or dried cranberries. Don’t be afraid of the olive oil here, it’s not going to taste like salad. This recipe can be doubled (or tripled!) and lasts for about a month.

Maple Pumpkin Spice Quinoa Granola

  • 2 1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt (I like Fleur de Sel)
  • 3/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (or make your own)
  • 1/3 cup uncooked quinoa (any color)
  • 2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup chopped nuts or seeds (optional)
  • 1/3 cup chopped dried fruit (optional)

Heat oven to 325F. In a large bowl, whisk oil, maple syrup, pumpkin, salt and spices. Stir in quinoa and oats until evening coated. Spread onto a large parchment-lined rimmed sheet tray. Bake for about 30-45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes or so. If you’re using nuts or seeds, add them in the last 10 minutes so they toast. Remove from oven and press down on granola with the back of a spatula. Sprinkle on dried fruit, if you’re using it. Allow to cool completely before breaking up into chunks.

Falafel-Stuffed Eggplant with Tahini Sauce and Tomato Relish

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While your Instagram feed may be blowing up with everything pumpkin spice, it’s still summer in my kitchen. Last winter, I signed up for my first CSA share. CSA stands for ‘Community Supported Agriculture’, and essentially it’s an investment into a farm. In exchange, you have the fortune of (in my case) 22 weeks of outstanding organic vegetables. Each Wednesday night, I walk about about 15 minutes to the pick-up site. I choose and weigh my vegetables and load them into my granny cart (glamorous, I know). A sample share from July:

  • fennel: 1 piece
  • peppers: 3 pieces
  • eggplant: 1 piece
  • fava beans: 1 pound
  • beets: 1 pound
  • garlic scapes: 0.25 pound
  • cucumbers: 2 pounds
  • greens: 1 pound
  • lettuce: 2 pieces
  • squash: 3 pieces

As you can see, you have to be cool with eating tons of veggies throughout the week. I’ve made countless batches of ratatouille, hot and cold soups and all manner of salads. My grocery shopping these days usually consists of breakfast staples, proteins/meat and fruit. I opted out of the fruit share, but I now wish I did (one week they got 5 lbs. of sour cherries…jealous!) Aside from a packed fridge to work through, it’s actually simplified the cooking I do at home.

I’ve been receiving a steady stream of eggplant all summer. Long, skinny eggplant, baby ‘fairy tale’ eggplant, even white ones. To prevent eggplant burnout (it’s a thing), I try to vary how I use it week to week. One week, it’s pasta alla norma, a recipe my Aunt Lee introduced me to. Another week, it might be miso-glazed eggplant over rice. This falafel-stuffed eggplant has got to be one of my favorites. I made it late last summer and dreamed of making it again ever since. What’s cool is you actually get two recipes in one – save the inside of the eggplant for baba ganoush.  This is your chance to use the last of the season’s tomatoes – get them before they’re gone! And if you’re not a member of a CSA, check out your local farmer’s market for most of the ingredients.

Falafel-Stuffed Eggplant with Tahini Sauce and Green Tomato Relish

Recipe from Cooking Light

Tahini sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons warm water
  • 2 tablespoons tahini (roasted sesame seed paste)
  • 4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon honey (optional)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 garlic clove, minced

Eggplant:

  • 2 eggplants (about 12 ounces each)
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon tahini (roasted sesame seed paste)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground Aleppo pepper (I used Piment D’Ville)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cups cooked chickpeas ( or 1 15-ounce can)

Relish:

  • 1 cup chopped seeded tomato  (I used a green tomato, use what you have)
  • 1/2 cup chopped seeded peeled cucumber
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Olive oil
  • Ground sumac, for serving (optional)

Heat oven to 475°.

To prepare eggplant, slice the eggplants in half lengthwise; score cut sides with a crosshatch pattern. Place the eggplant halves, cut sides down, on a baking sheet coated with olive oil. Bake at 475° for 7 minutes or until slightly tender and browned. Remove from oven; carefully scoop out pulp, leaving a 3/4-inch shell. Reserve pulp for another use (such as babaganoush). Season cut sides with about 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Combine about 1/2 teaspoon salt, onion, and next 11 ingredients (through chickpeas) in a food processor; process until smooth. Spoon 1/2 cup chickpea mixture into each eggplant shell. Bake at 475° for 25 minutes or until eggplant halves are tender and chickpea mixture is lightly browned.

To prepare sauce, combine first 6 ingredients in a small bowl, and stir with a whisk. Set aside.

To prepare relish, combine the tomato and remaining ingredients in a bowl; stir to combine.

Top eggplant with relish and sauce. Sprinkle with sumac before serving.

Endlessly Adaptable Scones

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One of my favorite “work perks” is free reign of a fully stocked pantry. I love rummaging through the cabinets looking for snack inspiration. I often make a simple snack for my cooking class students, especially if they’ll be eating towards the end of class. I’ve made countless cast-iron fritattas, crostini variations and cheese plates. But as the weather cools down, the oven turns up. Scones have become my go-to classroom snack lately, and for good reason. They are ridiculously simple to pull together and the flavor combinations are endless. Depending on my mood or the theme of the class, I’ll throw in fruit, nuts, herbs or even cheese. Unlike biscuits, these are more akin to English cream scones, relying on a heavy dose of the white stuff instead of butter. Yet somehow they come out of the oven super flaky and buttery. They would make a perfect addition to your next brunch or alongside a cup of coffee or milky tea. Let me know what flavors you come up with!

 

Endlessly Adaptable Scones

makes about 20 to 24 small or 8-10 medium scones

adapted from King Arthur Flour via Joy the Baker

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 1/3 to 1 1/2 cups heavy cream plus more for brushing the top
  • about 3/4 cup of anything (chopped fresh or dried fruit, chocolate chips, toasted nuts, etc.)
  • 1 teaspoon citrus zest (optional)
  • Raw sugar for topping
  • Jam, curd and/ or whipped cream for serving (optional)

Directions:

Place a rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat oven to 425 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with a Silpat or parchment paper and set aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, backing powder, salt, and sugar.  Set aside.

In a liquid measuring cup mix together vanilla extract and 1 1/3 cups cream. Drizzle the cream mixture into the dry ingredients tossing and stirring as you pour in the cream.  Add any mix-ins and zest, if using. Toss together.  Add 2 more tablespoons of cream if necessary to create a moist, cohesive, but not sticky dough.

Dump the dough onto a lightly floured work surface.  Gently gather and knead the dough into a dish and press the disk out into a 3/4″-thickness.

Use a small biscuit cutter to cut small 1 1/4-inch circles from the dough disk.  Brush each circle with heave cream and sprinkle generously with turbinado sugar.

Place 1-inch apart on the prepared baking sheet and bake for 12 to 14 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through.

Remove from the oven and serve warm.

 

Add-in suggestions:

1 T. orange zest + 1/3 cup dried cranberries + 1/3 cup chopped toasted pecans

1 T. lemon zest + 1/2 cup fresh berries (such as raspberries or blueberries)

For savory scones, you can omit the sugar and add a few handfuls of shredded cheese and/or herbs

 

Pickle-Brined Fried Chicken

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Sometimes I need to remind myself of certain things. Put my house (and work) keys in my bag. Wear sunscreen, even if it’s not sunny. Reconsider that third cup of coffee. Make fried chicken more often.

While it might be categorized under #chefproblems, I feel as if I need to remind myself to COOK sometimes. When I get home from work, the last thing I usually want to do is pull out pots and pans and pick up a knife. Yes, I cook quite a bit at home, but not what you might expect. Huge grain salads, various pickled things and freezable soups make up the majority of my weekly home “cooking”. Nothing fancy, to me at least.

My roommate recently celebrated a birthday and I asked her to choose a meal, any meal, to celebrate. She chose fried chicken. This is why we make such great roommates. I have been working on my fried chicken game for the past year or so. I was set on making a classic buttermilk version until I stumbled upon the pickle brine. Boneless, skinless thighs, brined in a quick pickling solution, quickly dunked in buttermilk, flour and fried? SOLD. While I love a bone-in, skin-on fried chicken, the skin is awfully difficult to crisp beneath the coating and can take a solid 15 minutes in the fryer. I’m sure America’s Test Kitchen (or at least Thomas Keller) has perfected this, but I didn’t have the energy to play Alton Brown.

What’s so great about this version is the ratio of tender meat to crispy coating. Every bite is the best bite. A friendly reminder why it’s worth it to fry chicken in the first place.

 

Pickle Brined Fried Chicken

Recipe adapted from Bon Appetit via Rose’s Luxury. I served it alongside a few simple salads. It’s really all about the chicken here.

Ingredients:

Brine

  •   2 tablespoon yellow or brown mustard seeds
  • 1 ½ teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • cup kosher salt
  • cup sugar
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh dill

 

Chicken

  • 8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs, preferably organic (about 3 lb.), halved if large
  • Vegetable oil (for frying; about 10 cups)
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • Kosher salt
  • Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)
  • Honey and hot sauce, for serving (see note)

Directions:

 
Toast mustard and coriander seeds in a dry medium saucepan over medium heat, tossing often, until mustard seeds begin to pop, about 3 minutes. Add vinegar, salt, and sugar and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring often, until salt and sugar are dissolved, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in dill and 4 cups water. Let coo.
 
Place chicken and brine in a large resealable plastic bag; chill 3 hours. Remove chicken from brine, scraping off seeds, cover, and chill until ready to fry.

 

Fit a large pot with thermometer and pour in oil to measure 2”. Heat over medium-high heat until thermometer registers 350°.

 

Meanwhile, place buttermilk in a large bowl. Place flour in another large bowl; season with kosher salt. Working in batches, coat chicken in buttermilk, then dredge in flour, dipping your fingers in buttermilk as you pack flour on to help create moistened, shaggy bits (the makings of a super-crisp crust); transfer to a baking sheet.

 

Working in batches and returning oil to 350° between batches, fry chicken, turning occasionally, until skin is deep golden brown and crisp and chicken is cooked through, 6–8 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack set inside a baking sheet. Sprinkle with flaky salt

 

Drizzle chicken with honey/hot sauce.
 
Note: I would highly suggest pairing with a honey-spiked hot sauce on the side. We used sriracha, because, sriracha.

Cooking Class Calendar

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Each month, I will update my class schedule at Sur La Table under the ‘Cooking Classes’ tab. I would love to see you there! The cooking school is located at 306 West 57th Street near 8th Avenue in Manhattan. For more details and how to sign up, click here. FYI the instructor name might be different than mine.

 

July 2014

Friday, 7/11 – Date Night: Hot off the Grill

Monday, 7/14 – Secrets of Great Grilled Seafood

Thursday, 7/17 – Girls Night Out: Summer Entertaining

Saturday, 7/19 – Date Night: Hot off the Grill (2 classes!)

Wednesday, 7/23 – Summer Fiesta

Friday, 7/25 – Date Night: Summer in Tuscany

Saturday, 7/26 – Knife Skills & Date Day: Summer Chef’s Table

Monday 7/26 – Friday 8/1 – Science in the Kitchen for Teens Camp

 

 

 

 

 

Baba Ganoush!

I love all things eggplant. Especially when it’s made into the creamy, smoky Middle Eastern dip baba ganoush. I mean, it’s even fun to say. I recently teamed up with my pal Joel, where he showed me a completely ingenious way to make it. I think this would be perfect to make on a camping glamping trip or for any summertime BBQ. If you’ve ever wondered how to ‘impregnate’ a vegetable with garlic, now you will know…

 

 

 

Kitchen Wasteland Videos

A few years ago, I found myself knee-deep in the world of cooking videos. A well-timed email led to a position working behind the scenes at SeeFood Media, a multi-kitchen studio located in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. While most people are familiar with the 30-minute cooking shows on Food Network, there’s a whole world of cooking videos gaining momentum on the web. One of my favorite projects was even nominated for James Beard Media Award!

Now that I teach cooking classes, stepping out in front of the camera has started to allure me a bit. My pal Joel has a cooking show and invited me on recently to shoot two shows. Here’s the first one!

Crispy Bacon Fried Cauliflower ‘Rice’

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Before you think I’ve turned Paleo, hear me out. I like rice, I really do. It’s essential for making risotto and all of the puddings at that Rice to Riches place in Soho. I’m pretty sure it’s the most commonly eaten food in the world. I don’t know. But sometimes, it’s good to mix it up. When you grate or pulse cauliflower in a food processor, it makes it…rice-like. It kind of blew my mind.

I’ve been teaching quite a few classes in Asian cuisine at work. It’s a nice break from Date Night Italian Cafe Romance (not a real class, but close).  There’s something admirable about showing up for a cooking class to learn how to make, say, Korean beef bulgogi, when just about every New Yorker has a #1 Asian Kitchen menu at their fingertips ready for delivery. Nothing makes me more happy than inspiring people to break their Seamless addiction. My job is funny sometimes.

This rendition on classic friend rice has two change-ups: that cauliflower ‘rice’ I mentioned and BACON. Yeah, bacon’s good. It’s played out, but whatever. It belongs in this fried rice. Everything else is pretty much business as normal. So if you HAVE to have rice, just sub in a few cups (leftover works best) for the cauliflower.

Kind of makes me reconsider Paleo. Except not.

 

Crispy Bacon Fried Cauliflower ‘Rice’

Makes 2 main course servings

  • 2 slices thick-cut smoked bacon, diced
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced, white and green parts divided
  • 1″ piece ginger, peeled minced
  • 1 carrot, peeled and minced
  • 1 large clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 large head cauliflower, thick stem removed, grated or pulsed*
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen peas
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium tamari (or more, to taste)
  • 1 large organic egg, beaten
  • Sesame oil, for garnish
  • Sesame seeds, for garnish
  • Sriracha, for garnish (optional)

Heat a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the bacon and render, stirring occasionally, until crispy, about 10 minutes. Remove the bacon onto a paper towel to drain, leaving the bacon fat in the skillet. Add white bits of scallion and ginger and saute, stirring occasionally, until scallion is soft, about 3 minutes. Add carrot and saute a few minutes more. Add ginger and saute for about 1 minute, stirring occasionally. Add the cauliflower ‘rice’ and increase heat to high. Cook cauliflower, stirring occasionally until tender and a bit crispy, about 5-10 minutes. You may add a swirl of oil (such as grapeseed or coconut) if it starts to get dry. You want some crispy bits of cauliflower.

Stir in peas and tamari. Add egg and stir vigorously to scramble the egg. Taste and add more tamari if you’d like. Serve hot topped with crispy bacon, sesame oil, sesame seeds and green scallion. And sriracha. Always sriracha

*Making cauliflower rice is easy. Pull out your big food processor and pulse the florets until small and rice-like. Or, go old school and grate it on the medium holes of a box grater. Either works.

Citrus Braised Cabbage, Apple, Goat Cheese, Red Wine Vinegar

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Walk into any shop right now and you’ll be inundated with SPRING. Yet, walk down the street in New York and we’re still girding ourselves with wooly layers and hot coffee. The in-between seasons make it easy to see the relation between food and fashion. Just as designers are debuting their seasonal collections, filled with florals and color and texture, so are the chefs. With food, it starts with asparagus. Somewhere in the country, the weather is warm enough to grow this springtime delicacy, and it’s shipped in massive quantities to our food stores, giving us a false sense of season. Here in the Northeast, we don’t get the green stuff until May, even June. What’s a cook to do?

I propose embracing the current season for all it’s worth. Just as it’s silly to wear a sundress in a snowstorm, eating peaches (or eggplant or asparagus) is just as silly in the off-season. This cabbage slaw comes from the LA’s Lemonade restaurant cookbook. It epitomizes the in-between season – a bit of winter, with a nod to the sunnier days ahead. It’s really delicious.

 

Citrus Braised Cabbage, Apple, Goat Cheese, Red Wine Vinegar

Adapted from The Lemonade Cookbook
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium red onion, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
2 tart apples, halved lengthwise, cored and thinly sliced
1 head red cabbage
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
Zest and juice of 1/2 large orange, divided
1 tablespoon pure maple syrup
4 ounces soft goat cheese, crumbled
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley and cilantro
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Slice the cabbage into quarters and cut away the core. Thinly slice the cabbage, set aside.

Heat a large, heavy pot or Dutch oven with olive oil. When hot, add onions and apples and a big pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 3 minutes.

Stir in the cabbage. When it begins to wilt, add the vinegar, orange juice, maple syrup and a big pinch of salt and pepper. Stir well. Cover the pot, reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes until the cabbage is soft. Stir occasionally. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Stir in reserved orange zest.

Place the cabbage in a large bowl and chill thoroughly. Just before serving, sprinkle with goat cheese and herbs.